About

Foxtail dbhI am currently a Davis H. Smith Postdoctoral Fellow based at UC Davis in the Latimer Lab. In May, 2019, I received my PhD from the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at UC Berkeley. Broadly, I study global change impacts in terrestrial plant communities. I combine novel methodological approaches with long-term observational and experimental data to disentangle the complex, interacting, and often nonlinear relationships between plant communities and global change drivers, including pests, pathogens, drought, and fire.

I spent much of my youth climbing trees and chasing racer snakes in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. My passion for the outdoors has led me to some of the most remote places in the lower 48, and has inspired a life-long commitment to ecosystem science and stewardship.

The outdoors have also long-provided me with a sense of well-being. As a first-generation college graduate on my mother’s side, and a female first-generation college graduate on my father’s side, I have experienced the challenges faced by low-income, first-generation students seeking a college and graduate degree. I am always open to conversations about DEI and strategies for navigating the Ivory Tower as a perceived outsider. Bottom line: everyone belongs in academia who wants to be in academia.

I am also dedicated to increasing DEI in academia. I currently serve on the Diversity Committee for the Society of Conservation Biology, I have recently co-authored two peer-reviewed papers that address indigenous rights and effective mentorship of non-majority students (see CV), and I have had the honor of being a SEEDs mentor in 2019 and 2020.

My research is grounded both by my personal experiences and the challenges we face in an era of unprecedented socio-ecological changes. It is up to us to explore, discover, and improve our treatment of each other and this incredible earth.

Connect with me:
Email: jdudney@berkeley.edu
Twitter: @dudney_joan
Latimer Lab, Postdoc
Battles Lab, PhD
Photos of me by Clayton Boyd